It is said that picture is worth a thousand words, and I agree. That’s why I like preparing technical drawings to explain various concepts. So, here it is – a short story of how async/await works in .NET.

thereisnothread

The main power behind async/await is that while we “await” on an ongoing I/O operation, the calling thread may be released for doing other work. And this provides a great thread re-usability. Thus, better scalability – much smaller number of threads is able to handle the same amount of operations comparing to asynchronous/waiting approach.

The main role here plays so-called overlapped I/O (in case of Windows) which allows to asynchronously delegate the I/O operation to the operating system, and only after completion the provided callback will notify us about the result. The main workforce here is so-called I/O completion port (IOCP).Continue reading

poh01

In the upcoming .NET 5 a very interesting change is added to the GC – a dedicated Pinned Object Heap, a very new type of the managed heap segment (as we haveĀ Small and Large Object Heaps so far). Pinning has its own costs, because it introduces fragmentation (and in general complicates object compaction a lot). We are used to have some good practices about it, like “pin only for…:

  • a very short time” so, the GC will not bother – to reduce probability that the GC happens while many objects were pinned. That’s a scenario to use fixed keyword, which is in fact only a very lightweight way of flagging particular local variable as a pinned reference. As long as GC does not happen, there is no additional overhead.
  • a very long time”, so the GC will promote those objects to generation 2 – as gen2 GCs should be not so common, the impact will be minimized also. That’s a scenario to use GCHandle of type Pinned, which is a little bigger overhead because we need to allocate/free handle.

However, even if applied, those rules will produce some fragmentation, depending how much you pin, for how long, what’s the resulting layout of the pinned objects in memory and many other, intermittent conditions.

So, in the end, it would be perfect just to get rid of pinned objects and move them to a different place than SOH/LOH. This separate place would be simply ignored, by the GC design, when considering heap compaction so we will get pinning behaviour out of the box.Continue reading