TL;DR – would be post-mortem finalization available thanks to phantom references useful in .NET? What is your opinion, especially based on your experience with the finalization of your use cases? Please, share your insights in comments!

Both JVM and CLR has the concept of finalizers which is a way of implicit (non-deterministic) cleanup – at some point after an object is recognized as no longer reachable (and thus, may be garbage collected) we may take an action specified by the finalizer – a special, dedicated method (i.e. Finalize in C#, finalize in Java). This is mostly used for the purpose of cleaning/releasing non-managed resources held by the object to be reclaimed (like OS-limited, and thus valuable, file or socket handles).

However, such form of finalization has its caveats (elaborated in detail below). That’s why in Java 9 finalize() method (and thus, finalization in general) has been deprecated, which is nicely explained in the documentation:

“Deprecated. The finalization mechanism is inherently problematic. Finalization can lead to performance issues, deadlocks, and hangs. Errors in finalizers can lead to resource leaks; there is no way to cancel finalization if it is no longer necessary; and no order is specified among calls to finalize methods of different objects. Furthermore, there are no guarantees regarding the timing of finalization. The finalize method might be called on a finalizable object only after an indefinite delay, if at all.”

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We can often hear that allocation of objects is “cheap” in .NET. I fully support this sentence because the most important part is its continuation – allocation is cheap but allocating a lot of objects will hit you back as sooner or later garbage collector will kick in and start messing around. Thus, the fewer allocations, the better.

However, I would like to add a few words about “allocation is cheap” itself. This is true to some extent because the typical path of objects allocation is indeed really fast. So-called bump a pointer technique is most often used. It consists of the following simple steps:

  • it uses so-called allocation pointer as an address of a newly created object
  • it increases allocation pointer by the requested size (so next object will be created there

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Zero Garbage Collector on .NET Core

Starting from .NET Core 2.0 coupling between Garbage Collector and the Execution Engine itself have been loosened. Prior to this version, the Garbage Collector code was pretty much tangled with the rest of the CoreCLR code. However, Local GC initiative in version 2.0 is already mature enough to start using it. The purpose of the exercise we are going to do is to prepare Zero Garbage Collector that replaces the default one.

Zero Garbage Collector is the simplest possible implementation that in fact does almost nothing. It only allows you to allocate objects, because this is obviously required by the Execution Engine. Created objects are never automatically deleted and theoretically, no longer needed memory is never reclaimed. Why one would be interested in such a simple GC implementation? There are at least two reasons:Continue reading

Trace Compass

.NET Core on Linux is still very fresh in 2017. First production deployments are just beginning to emerge. Consequently, development on this platform is only beginning to show up. There is a lack of knowledge and good practices related to virtually every aspect of the existence of this environment. One of them is monitoring and diagnostic aspect. How can we monitor and analyze the health of our application?

The easiest way of getting tracing data is by using official perfcollect bash script and then using Perfview on Windows to analyze this recorded data. This approach has some drawbacks. The main one is are fairly limited analysis results available in PerfView. The second, less burdensome, is the need for Windows to… analyze Linux data. Recently Sasha Goldstein has created a lot of valuable material on this subject and I invite you to review the list posted at the end of this post.

I would like to present another diagnostic option here. This is using the free Eclipse Trace Compass tool. Continue reading

Note: This is a first entry of a new series about Microsoft .NET CLR internals. I encourage you to ask – the most interesting questions will become a similar posts in the future! This one was inspired by Angelika Piątkowska.

How does Object.GetType() really work?

Extending this question: How an object knows what type it is? Is it the compiler or the runtime that knows that? How this is related to the CLR? As C# is statically and strongly typed, maybe the method call GetType() does not really exist, and the compiler can replace it with the appropriate result already at compile time?Continue reading

coreclr1

Today I would like to walk you through the process of compiling, running and debugging of .NET Core – that is the open source version of .NET environment. Let’s go to the answer to the simple question straight away…

What for?

In order to push the boat out. We got the source of .NET! Why do we need to compile it? In order to tamper, change, analyze, damage it – so that in the end up at Pull Request and record ourselves in Hall of Fame as our code will go to millions of computers all over the world!

Even if we don’t have such ambitious plans, isn’t it just fun to look inside .NET? Of course, it’s not the code of commercial .NET in one-to-one relation. However, the most of the inner part is the same, so there is plenty to play with. .NET foundation site states it plainly:Continue reading