TL;DR – would be post-mortem finalization available thanks to phantom references useful in .NET? What is your opinion, especially based on your experience with the finalization of your use cases? Please, share your insights in comments!

Both JVM and CLR has the concept of finalizers which is a way of implicit (non-deterministic) cleanup – at some point after an object is recognized as no longer reachable (and thus, may be garbage collected) we may take an action specified by the finalizer – a special, dedicated method (i.e. Finalize in C#, finalize in Java). This is mostly used for the purpose of cleaning/releasing non-managed resources held by the object to be reclaimed (like OS-limited, and thus valuable, file or socket handles).

However, such form of finalization has its caveats (elaborated in detail below). That’s why in Java 9 finalize() method (and thus, finalization in general) has been deprecated, which is nicely explained in the documentation:

“Deprecated. The finalization mechanism is inherently problematic. Finalization can lead to performance issues, deadlocks, and hangs. Errors in finalizers can lead to resource leaks; there is no way to cancel finalization if it is no longer necessary; and no order is specified among calls to finalize methods of different objects. Furthermore, there are no guarantees regarding the timing of finalization. The finalize method might be called on a finalizable object only after an indefinite delay, if at all.”

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Tune screenshot

I would like to present you a new tool I’ve started to work on recently. I’ve called it The Ultimate .NET Experiment (Tune) as its purpose is to learn .NET internals and performance tuning by experiments with C# code. As it is currently in very early 0.2 version, it can be treated as Proof Of Concept with many, many features still missing. But it is usable enough to have some fun with it already.

The main way of working with this tool is as follows:

  • write a sample, valid C# script which contains at least one class with public method taking a single string parameter. It will be executed by hitting Run button. This script can contain as many additional methods and classes as you wish. Just remember that first public method from the first public class will be executed (with single parameter taken from the input box below the script). You may also choose whether you want to build in Debug or Release mode (note: currently it is only x64 bit compilation).
  • after clicking Run button, the script will be compiled and executed. Additionally, it will be decompiled both to IL (Intermediate Language) and assembly code in the corresponding tab.
  • all the time Tune is running (including time during script execution) a graph with GC data is being drawn. It shows information about generation sizes and GC occurrences (as vertical lines with the number below showing which generation has been triggered).

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Book Cover

 

I don’t know if you have a driving license. Even if not, you will surely understand this sublime analogy presented by me. Sometimes, you drive a car and know traffic regulations. You can drive this manner successfully for the whole life. However, if you aim to be a professional driver, an old stager, it takes whole days in a car and sooner or later you get dirty with grease by working with an engine. This is how I see the .NET developer’s life. The vast majority may ride „very well”, knowing the syntax, design patterns, tricks of trade. They are professionals. Yet, there is a small group of geeks, nerds, old stagers, that are looking for something more. They want to understand CLR internals, know how does everything work, how to dig in into memory and how to use raw tools such as WinDbg. I consider this is plainly speaking a mind-absorbing occupation and can draws everybody’s attention, even for a while. The popularity of devWorkshops delivered in Poland  by me and Sebastian Solnica confirms this presumption.Continue reading