Tune screenshot

I would like to present you a new tool I’ve started to work on recently. I’ve called it The Ultimate .NET Experiment (Tune) as its purpose is to learn .NET internals and performance tuning by experiments with C# code. As it is currently in very early 0.2 version, it can be treated as Proof Of Concept with many, many features still missing. But it is usable enough to have some fun with it already.

The main way of working with this tool is as follows:

  • write a sample, valid C# script which contains at least one class with public method taking a single string parameter. It will be executed by hitting Run button. This script can contain as many additional methods and classes as you wish. Just remember that first public method from the first public class will be executed (with single parameter taken from the input box below the script). You may also choose whether you want to build in Debug or Release mode (note: currently it is only x64 bit compilation).
  • after clicking Run button, the script will be compiled and executed. Additionally, it will be decompiled both to IL (Intermediate Language) and assembly code in the corresponding tab.
  • all the time Tune is running (including time during script execution) a graph with GC data is being drawn. It shows information about generation sizes and GC occurrences (as vertical lines with the number below showing which generation has been triggered).

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Zero Garbage Collector on .NET Core

Starting from .NET Core 2.0 coupling between Garbage Collector and the Execution Engine itself have been loosened. Prior to this version, the Garbage Collector code was pretty much tangled with the rest of the CoreCLR code. However, Local GC initiative in version 2.0 is already mature enough to start using it. The purpose of the exercise we are going to do is to prepare Zero Garbage Collector that replaces the default one.

Zero Garbage Collector is the simplest possible implementation that in fact does almost nothing. It only allows you to allocate objects, because this is obviously required by the Execution Engine. Created objects are never automatically deleted and theoretically, no longer needed memory is never reclaimed. Why one would be interested in such a simple GC implementation? There are at least two reasons:Continue reading

Trace Compass

.NET Core on Linux is still very fresh in 2017. First production deployments are just beginning to emerge. Consequently, development on this platform is only beginning to show up. There is a lack of knowledge and good practices related to virtually every aspect of the existence of this environment. One of them is monitoring and diagnostic aspect. How can we monitor and analyze the health of our application?

The easiest way of getting tracing data is by using official perfcollect bash script and then using Perfview on Windows to analyze this recorded data. This approach has some drawbacks. The main one is are fairly limited analysis results available in PerfView. The second, less burdensome, is the need for Windows to… analyze Linux data. Recently Sasha Goldstein has created a lot of valuable material on this subject and I invite you to review the list posted at the end of this post.

I would like to present another diagnostic option here. This is using the free Eclipse Trace Compass tool. Continue reading